30 Day Anime Challenge – Day 25: Saddest Anime Death

This post is part of The 30 Day Anime Challenge Series alongside the Cosmic Anvil Kickstarter campaign. Click here to read the introduction, and click here to check out and support the campaign to help us fund the printing and distribution of our first collected volume of our manga-inspired comic series, Age of Revolution.


[SPOILER ALERT: Obviously, there will be death scenes discussed in this post!]

Jess Hardcastle Marketing Whizz Kid

One of the saddest deaths I’ve ever seen in anime is the death of Maes Hughes in Full Metal Alchemist Brotherhood. I was genuinely distraught by his death, especially as we get to know his wife and young daughter who are left behind, and considering how much he also takes care of everyone including Edward, Alphonse and Winry 😦


Hannah Collins Co-Founder and Artist

As I’ve said before during this blog series, I’m a complete wimp – I cry very easily at nearly anything, from TV adverts to just watching the news sometimes. That’s why for this post I decided to go with a death scene that I that I didn’t expect to make me as sad as it did, and also one that I never see come up on ‘saddest deaths in anime’ lists, and that’s Ciel Phantomhive’s death in the season one finale of Black Butler, or Kuroshitsuji.

Ciel Phantomhive's death, Black Butler

Ciel Phantomhive’s death, Black Butler

I was completely hooked on this anime when it came out in 2008 from the very first episode. In a genre that is totally over-saturated with cliche, Yana Toboso’s Black Butler breathed new life into the Supernatural, ‘monster-of-the-week’ structure of story-telling with it’s gothic style, ghoulish humour, endearing characters, and new twists on British legends and history.

Set in a Victorian-era England, the story follows orphaned thirteen-year-old Earl Ciel Phantomhive, who after witnessing his parent’s murder at the hands of a mysterious occult group, vows revenge on their killers. Hearing his cries for vengeance, a demon offers him a contract: assistance in helping him reek his revenge in exchange for his soul. Ciel accepts, and the demon takes the guise of Sebastian Michaelis, his loyal and extraordinarily skilled butler.

Black Butler Anime

Sebastian and the Phantomhive Mansion staff protect Ciel from harm.

But the path to attaining Ciel’s precious revenge isn’t a straight one. As well as heading up the Phantomhive’s toy company (which is clearly intended to be ironic considering Ciel has no interest in childish pursuits) the young Earl must also fulfil his family duties as Queen Victoria’s ‘Guard Dog’ and protect the Queendom from ‘abnormal’ threats. Werewolf attacks, Jack the Ripper, child prostitution, royal ghosts, rogue angels… These are all dangerous missions that Ciel and Sebastian take on together through the first series.

All the while, Sebastian attends to Ciel’s every whim and need with delicate precision to little to no expression of gratitude from his stoic master. It seems that Ciel’s heart has been hardened by the early trauma he has had to endure, to the point at which he has completely abandoned his own childhood. Instead of playing with other children he attends business lunches and signs documents in his study. Sebastian endeavours to melt his frostiness with a strange gentile touch, strange because every act of kindness his performs for Ciel is always tinged with that underlying feeling of hunger for the soul he is fattening up. You see, Sebastian doesn’t just want any old soul: he wants one he has grown and nurtured until it’s just right to eat.

Black Butler ending Sebastian carries Ciel to his final resting place

Sebastian carries Ciel to his final resting place.

This all reaches an inevitable climax at the end of the series when Ciel’s soul is indeed ripe enough for Sebastian’s tastes. But what caught me completely off-guard about the final sequence is how moving it was. I was expecting something bloody and monstrous, but it turned out to be strangely tender and peaceful. Sebastian rows Ciel to a strange deserted island and lays him down on a bench in an abandoned ruin. He removes Ciel’s eyepatch that hides the eye inscribed with the demonic contract, and Ciel smiles up at him – not fearful, or in pain, but relieved and satisfied. Sebastian leans in with a fanged smile towards his lips… and that’s it. I don’t know why it choked me up so much. I guess I didn’t realise how invested I’d become in these two over such a short episode run, or how cathartic a death I knew was inevitable would feel. Rather than a hunter consuming its prey, it felt more like a close friend helping anther to find a much-needed release from life.

Such a shame then that such a satisfying ending was kind of ruined by a bizarre second season :/ At least the manga is still going strong though!

Honourable mentions: L (Death Note), Maes Hughes & Nina Tucker (Full Metal Alchemist & Brotherhood), Spike Spiegel (Cowboy Bebop), Asuka Langley Soryu (End of Evangelion), Koworu Nagisa (Neon Genesis Evangelion) Seita and Satsuma (Grave of the Fireflies), Kikyo (InuYasha).


Huw Williams CO-Founder and Writer

I’ve already talked about two deaths during this series, so in order to not repeat myself, I’ve had to really think hard about another anime death that left me feeling emotional. One of my saddest anime deaths (apart from the ones I’ve already talked about) is the death of Wizardmon in Digimon Adventures.

Wizardmon and Gatomon (left to right).

Wizardmon and Gatomon (left to right)

Wizardmon is the best friend of Gatomon, the Digimon partner to Digidestined Kari – sister of original Digidestined Tai. Gatomon is introduced to us as a Digimon who works for Myotismon, one of the many villains of the series, and one of her redeeming qualities is her friendship with Wizardmon, showing that maybe these two aren’t as evil as their master.

It is revealed to us that Kari is a Digidestined, and that Gatomon is her Digimon partner. Myotismon learns this and battles the Digidestined now including Kari and Gatomon, he tries to attack Gatomon, but Wizardmon takes the hit, sacrificing his life for his friend. I remember watching this as a kid on my VHS tape that I used to record Digimon on, and crying my eyes out. The most touching part of his death is how zen he is. Gatomon says sorry and blames herself, but Wizardmon calmly says that he has had a happy life, and the reason for that was Gatomon’s friendship. He thanks her for it and passes away.

Here is Wizardmon’s death scene for you to watch… you know, if you’re into that sort of thing:


Written by The Cosmic Anvil Team.

Check out our own Welsh-manga (or ‘Wanga’) series, AGE OF REVOLUTION on our official site and Comixology! And if you want to join the fight to get the AGE OF REVOLUTION Volume printed check out our Kickstarter page

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30 Day Anime Challenge – Day 14: Anime That Never Gets Old No Matter How Many Times You’ve Rewatched It

This post is part of The 30 Day Anime Challenge Series alongside the Cosmic Anvil Kickstarter campaign. Click here to read the introduction, and click here to check out and support the campaign to help us fund the printing and distribution of our first collected volume of our manga-inspired comic series, Age of Revolution.


Jess Hardcastle Marketing Whizz Kid

For me this is a toss up between some of the anime series’ I watched when I was younger, including: Pokemon, Digimon and Cardcaptor Sakura. But I think my choice for this challenge is going to have to be Cardcaptor Sakura as it’s the one I’ve re-watched the most and always enjoy.

Some of the Pokemon episodes annoy me – especially when Ash can’t remember having a Butterfree – and with Digimon I never watched all of the series as I hated the one with the train… *Googles what series is called* Ah yes, Digimon Frontier. So Cardcaptor Sakura is a no-brainer!

Cardcaptor_Sakura_BD_volume_1_cover (1)

Carcaptor Sakura


Hannah Collins Co-Founder and Artist

My original choice was going to be Cardcaptor Sakura, as it’s the only series that I’ve re-watched 3 whole times, and I will almost definitely watch it again and again in the years to come. However, as I thought it would be better to pick something different to Jess, I’m going to with a Studio Ghibli favourite of mine: Howl’s Moving Castle.

Howl's Moving Castle Studio Ghibli Hayao Miyazaki 30 day anime challenge cosmic anvil

Howl’s Moving Castle

This film is like a classic Disney movie to me – I know all the words, I know the story back to front, and yet I never get sick of revisiting it, and it never ceases to make me feel exactly the same feelings I did upon first watching it. Films like this feel as good as a hot drink on a cold day – nurturing and fulfilling every time.

The story is essentially a fairy tale in which each character must learn a valuable lesson: selfish but talented wizard Howl must learn self-sacrifice in order to find true love; and shop girl Sophie must conversely learn to love herself before she can love another; the villainous witch must learn to let go of unreturned affections; and the King must learn to abandon a self-serving and pointless war… I could go on through the entire cast, but I won’t. Howl and Sophie are the missing pieces in each other’s lives – but they must overcome societal and personal obstacles before they can prove it to the other.

Moreover, like all Studio Ghibli films, it’s filled with vibrant and interesting characters, humour, magic, brilliant world-building, anti-war rhetoric, and breathtakingly drawn scenes like this one:

Howl's Moving Castle Studio Ghibli Hayao Miyazaki 30 day anime challenge cosmic anvil

Howl in his bedroom with Sophie by his side.

The little digs at Howl – the fabulously vain ladies man – are also really funny. One scene in particular that I quote constantly is when Howl dyes his hair with the wrong potion (due to Sophie rearranging everything in an effort to clean the Castle) and laments about how hideous he looks. Sophie – who has been cursed with an ageing spell – tries (and fails) to comfort him:

(Sorry for the poor quality – that was the only clip I could find!)

Honourable mentions: Cardcaptor Sakura, Death Note, Princess Mononoke, Ouran High School Host Club, D.Gray-Man, Black Butler, Neon Genesis Evangelion.


Huw Williams CO-Founder and Writer

I don’t re-watch this anime often, but when I do, I love every episode all over again. The anime I that never gets old for me is Outlaw Star.

Outlaw Star

Outlaw Star

The series takes place in the “Toward Stars Era” universe in which spacecrafts are capable of traveling faster than the speed of light. The plot follows protagonist Gene Starwind and his motley crew of an inherited ship dubbed the “Outlaw Star”, as they search for a legendary, outer space treasure trove called the “Galactic Leyline”.

SPACESHIP!

SPACESHIP!

Most anime I can re-watch happily, but even in some of my favourite anime there are episodes that I either don’t like or are impartial to. But with Outlaw Star I love every episode. I love how ‘old timey’ it feels even though it’s set in space, and every member of the crew is interesting and are genuine, fully-rounded characters. Re-watching Outlaw Star to me is like reading your favourite childhood book, just like when a Harry Potter fan picks up The Philosopher’s Stone again and is reintroduced to Hogwarts.

The Crew

The Crew

Dragon Ball is always going to be my favourite anime ever, but when it comes to revisiting it, I prefer to read the manga than watch the anime. Whereas Outlaw Star is so fun to watch, and the cast are like old friends, even the narrator sounds like a parent is reading me the tale. It’s the best.


Written by The Cosmic Anvil Team.

Check out our own Welsh-manga (or ‘Wanga’) series, AGE OF REVOLUTION on our official site and Comixology! And if you want to join the fight to get the AGE OF REVOLUTION Volume printed check out our Kickstarter page!

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30 Day Anime Challenge – Day 11: Favourite Mech Anime

This post is part of The 30 Day Anime Challenge Series alongside the Cosmic Anvil Kickstarter campaign. Click here to read the introduction, and click here to check out and support the campaign to help us fund the printing and distribution of our first collected volume of our manga-inspired comic series, Age of Revolution.


Jess Hardcastle Marketing Whizz Kid

Unfortunately I really haven’t seen any Mech anime, unless Digimon Adventure 2 counts when they use Armor Digivolution?

Armordigivolve2

Digi-Armour Energise!

Apologies! I did mention I still need to watch Neon Genesis Evangelion if that makes up for my lack of Mech anime knowledge!


Hannah Collins Co-Founder and Artist

Jess, you do need to watch more Mech anime (because its AWESOME) and you should certainly watch Neon Genesis Evangelion as it’s not only my favourite Mech anime, but it’s also my favourite anime series ever.

Neon Gensis Evangelion mech anime manga anno shinji asuka rei 30 day anime challenge cosmic anvil

Neon Genesis Evangelion

What do I say about this insane masterpiece of an anime that hasn’t already been said?

The basic (and I mean basic) story follows 14-year-old Shinji Ikari in a post-apocalyptic re-built version of Tokyo, fifteen years after a global cataclysm wiped out a huge chunk of human civilisation. Shinji discovers he is one a handful of teenagers – that includes two girls called Asuka and Rei – destined to pilot the giant Eva mechs to ward off the earth from intermittent attacks from alien/supernatural beings known as ‘Angels’. The base of operations for the Eva pilots is NERV, which turns out to be headed up by Shinji’s absent, creepy father, Gendo. Their mission? To prevent another catastrophe from happening. Or at least, that’s part of their mission…

The history of the show’s creation is a lesson in exceeded expectations. Animation studio Gainax originally commissioned just a run-of-the-mill Mech anime from director Hideki Anno, and what Anno produced was an infuriatingly intricate thesis on theology, philosophy, psychology, and the nature of human existence that fans still obsess over to this day, fifteen years after it’s release. Evangelion went on to dramatically redefine and rejuvenate a well-established genre – not to mention become one of the most critically and commercially successful anime ever (the franchise has generated a whopping 150 billion yen so far).

Kaworu Shinji Eva 13 neon genesis evangelion mech anime manga anno 30 day anime challenge cosmic anvil

Co-Pilots Kaworu and Shinji inside the Eva 13 (Rebuild).

The Mech in Evangelion were also revolutionary for the genre. Far more than just suits or robots, they’re biologically fuelled and biologically linked to their pilots, which also unfortunately means that their pain is shared by their pilots. A similar idea that inspired Guillermo del Toro’s Jaeger mechs in his 2013 film Pacific Rim. In fact, the Evas are so animalistic that they can even break free of their pilots’ control by entering ‘berserk’ mode – which looks exactly as you’d expect:

Mech anime are always set in world’s in turmoil. After all, you don’t really need a Mech in a time of peace, do you? What raises Evangelion above others of the genre is not only it’s grand scope, but the relatable (if not melodramatically heightened) angst of its teenage characters. Haunted by abandonment, depression, and severe insecurity, Shinji is one of the most emotionally unstable heroes I’ve ever come across.

You really do feel the weight of the world’s survival constantly balancing on his tiny shoulders, and he continually seems ready to be happily crushed by it just to make all the nightmare-fuelling trauma stop.

Honourable mentions: The Big OCode Geass, Eureka 7, Guilty Crown.


Huw Williams CO-Founder and Writer

I don’t watch a lot of Mech anime, which is surprising as I do love Mechs. A a kid, pretending that I was in a giant robot was the norm, thanks to my breakfast consisting of cereal, juice and Power Rangers. I think the few that I have watched have been pretty good, and my favourite is probably one of the most underrated animes out there: The Big O.

The Big O.

The Big O.

The Big O is set in Paradigm City, a New York-styled city that has been contained under huge domes. Forty years ago, a mysterious event took place that erased everyone’s memories. In this world of amnesia, Roger Smith assumes the role of a negotiator for the city and fights crime with his two partners: an android by the name of Dorothy and his Butler, Gordon. But if the occasion calls for it, Roger calls out the secret third member of his team – the giant robot Big O!

Epic Team Up

Roger calls Big O with his watch.

The Big O is a crazy mix of Film Noir and Mech anime. The aesthetic style is also very rooted in the 50s/60s, taking inspiration from Toho’s Kaiju movies and Western Detective dramas. This mix of genres makes Big O a really interesting watch as the story has a good balance of investigative work and giant robot battles. Roger is also one of the coolest protagonists in anime: slick and stylish, a bachelor in the James Bond mold, and a mysterious past which slowly gets unlocked as time goes on.

The action is awesome as well. For an anime that makes you think hard, it pays you back tenfold with awesome giant robot fights!

Big O Vs. Big Fau

Big O Vs. Big Fau

Big O is an awesome Mech as well: it’s strong, it’s quite nimble for a steampunk design, and it packs a ton of weapons as well. The bond between Big O and Roger is interesting as well. There are times when the scene that is shot in a way that makes the mech look as if it’s expressionless face is emitting some sort of emotion, and you do get the feeling the Big O and Roger are brothers in arms and have some sort of spiritual relationship like Ed and Al in Full Metal Alchemist. I highly recommend this anime to anyone who loves mech, but get ready to have your mind messed with.


Written by The Cosmic Anvil Team.

Check out our own Welsh-manga (or ‘Wanga’) series, AGE OF REVOLUTION on our official site and Comixology! And if you want to join the fight to get the AGE OF REVOLUTION Volume printed check out our Kickstarter page

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30 Day Anime Challenge – Day 2: Favourite Anime You’ve Watched So Far

This post is part of The 30 Day Anime Challenge Series alongside the Cosmic Anvil Kickstarter campaign. Click here to read the introduction, and click here to check out and support the campaign to help us fund the printing and distribution of our first collected volume of our manga-inspired comic series, Age of Revolution!


Jess Hardcastle Marketing Whizz Kid

Now, this is a tough one as I have really enjoyed lots of anime I’ve been watching recently for my N00b Review posts but at the same time get really nostalgic about some anime series’ I watched as a kid. There was a lot of discussion in the Cosmic Anvil office with this one as it was really difficult to decide which one was our absolute favourite. However, I think I’m going to have to go with Attack On Titan for this one.

Attack on Titan Cover

Attack on Titan

 It was a series I went in with no expectations of, even though I know a lot of people who’d raved about it. I was really shocked even after watching just the first episode. It was also a series with very little filler and loads of action which I really enjoyed. I ended up binge watching all 25 episodes in the space of a couple of days on Netflix!

Honorable mentions: Psycho Pass, SAO (First Arc), Full Metal Alchemist and Digimon (1st and 2nd Season).


Hannah Collins Co-Founder and Artist

Oh this is a tough one! > . < Like Jess, I’m really torn between my head and heart – nostalgia and rationale. However, after a loooooong mental debate with myself, I’ve decided on Studio Ghibli’s Princess Mononoke. Not only is it my favourite anime, but it’s also my current favourite film of all time, so how could I not pick it for this post? A favourite film to me doesn’t have to be the most perfect film ever made, it just has to be something you can literally watch forever and ever and never get bored of it, and something that you get something new out of every single time. Princess Mononoke is that film for me.

Princess Mononoke Cosmic Anvil 30 Day anime challenge blog

San and her Wolf brother in Princess Mononoke

Hayao Miyazaki’s signature art style is beautifully animated as usual, and the story is punctuated with surreal magic, humour, melancholy, and filled with a diverse and likeable cast of characters with no easy answers to the story’s ‘man vs. nature’ quandary. San (the Princess) also follows the Miyazaki tradition of strong female action heroes steering the plot that I love to see – precocious, passionate, but not without her vulnerabilities. Both the subbed and dubbed versions are equal in quality too, which is something Studio Ghibli have consistently done well over the years of Americanising their films.

Anime gets a bad wrap sometimes – usually from people who have never watched any properly – for being too violent, too sexualised, and too hard to follow. To those people I would perscribe Princess Mononoke as a shining example of how magical, unique, and universally beautiful Japanese animation can be.

Honourable mentions: Neon Genesis Evangelion, Death Note, Cardcaptor Sakura, Howl’s Moving Castle, Akira, Ghost in The Shell, Black Butler, D-Gray Man, Full Metal Alchemist, Soul Eater.


Huw Williams CO-Founder and Writer

One Piece is the best.

One Piece is also a strange show. It’s been running for so long that I both have nostalgia for it, and new experiences with it. “Ah, remember One Piece, oh wait, of course I do it’s still going!” Jokes aside, One Piece has been going on for a long time – eighteen years to be exact – but I’m still enjoying the cruise. Yes, there is a lot of filler but it’s still enjoyable, and Eiichiro Oda has created some amazing characters and watching them mess around, or crossing over with other Shonen shows like Dragon Ball and/or Toriko is fun to watch. Also, if we didn’t have filler, we wouldn’t have had this hilarious moment:

The characters of One Piece are vibrant and deep, and the world is huge and houses a rich history. In fact, if I had to describe Oda as a creator I would compare him to G.R.R. Martin – someone who has taken his medium and genre and launched it to the next level of fantasy storytelling in terms of the depths of family trees and complex and vibrant histories. Oda is the same, not only does he write about the generation that Luffy and Co are in but he maps out multiple generations of Pirates and Marines. When the Straw Hat Pirates are visiting an island or city, you truly learn everything about that place, it’s past, present, and watch how it’s future unfolds.

Son, Father, Grandfather (Left to Right)

Son, Father, Grandfather (Left to Right)

Oda’s character design is unlike anything I’ve seen as well. It’s truly his and his alone. He has admitted that he was inspired as a kid by the likes of Akira Toriyama (creator of Dragon Ball) – another artist with his own distinctive style. I love how he draws body shapes particularly – you get some really wacky body types in the world of One Piece: square torsos, long necks the same width of their heads, there is even a race of people with two sets of elbows. I don’t know why or how, but I like it.

Just look at these guys!

Just look at these guys!

One last thing: the super powers in One Piece are so cool. Someone could have an awful sounding super power, but still be one of the strongest people in the world. Take the character Donquixote Doflamingo, for example. He can create and manipulate string, which sounds like he pulled the short straw, but think again. With this he is able to control people, create replicas of himself, cut through anything, swing from clouds… the list endless and bizarre. It’s almost like Oda is saying: it doesn’t matter what you’ve got, as long as you know how to use it well, you’ll go far.

Honorable Mentions: Dragon Ball/DBZ, Toriko, Kinnikuman, Outlaw Star, Attack on Titan.


Written by The Cosmic Anvil Team.

Check out our own Welsh-manga (or ‘Wanga’) series, AGE OF REVOLUTION on our official site and Comixology! And if you want to join the fight to get the AGE OF REVOLUTION Volume printed check out our Kickstarter page

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Kickstarter new reward tier £15 pledge cosmic anvil

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30 Day Anime Challenge – Day 1: The Very First Anime You Watched

This post is part of The 30 Day Anime Challenge Series alongside the Cosmic Anvil Kickstarter campaign. Click here to read the introduction, and click here to check out and support the campaign to help us fund the printing and distribution of our first collected volume of our manga-inspired comic series, Age of Revolution!


Jess Hardcastle Marketing Whizz Kid

Pokemon

Misty, Ash, and Brock

The first anime I can remember watching was probably Pokemon with my little sister, but at the time I didn’t understand what anime was and didn’t realise that I was watching it! I probably watched it on Jetix on CITV (in the UK).

Jetix_logo

Jetix Logo from CiTV

Another thing people might find interesting is the fact that I never played any of the original Pokemon games until a few years ago in University and was never interested in the card game as a kid. But me and my sister did collect the Pokemon stickers and would spend near enough all our pocket money on them every weekend.

Pokemon stickers

Pokemon stickers!

I also remember arguing over which one of us was getting a Pokeball and Pokedex toys for Christmas one year because one of us had to have the Pokeball and one of us had to have the Pokedex as we couldn’t both have the same one!  I had the Pokeball game and she had the Pokedex in the end.

Pokeball Game

Pokeball Game

pokedex

Pokedex

Honorable mentions: Yu-Gi-Oh!, Cardcaptor Sakura, Beyblade and Digimon.


Hannah Collins Co-Founder and Artist

The Cosmic Anvil team are all about the same age (children’s of the 90s), so we’re probably all going to have similar answers to this question! Many people regard the 1990s as a ‘golden era’ for anime in terms of popularisation in the West, with AkiraGhost In The Shell and Neon Genesis Evangelion being hugely influential.

Unfortunately, none of the above were my first exposure to anime as I was far too young to have any knowledge of their existence. Like Jess, I grew up on a diet of Jetix and watching Americanised dubbed versions of shows, and again like Jess, the first anime I remember watching was Pokemon. I was very much sucked into the whole Pokemon franchise phenomenon – the show, the games, the films, the cards, the stickers, the figures… I even still have a t-shirt that I can just about squeeze myself into!

I also still have the special edition cards that were given out at the cinema when the first film – Mewtwo Strikes Back – came out, and I still remember the sinking disappointment upon discovering that the super shiny Mew card (which I thought would one day be worth ALL the money) was simply a sticker on some cardboard.

Shiny Mew Card

Damn you, shiny fake Mew!


Huw Williams CO-Founder and Writer

Now, my first anime… you’ve probably never heard of it. It’s called Pokemon…?

Yeah I know, Hannah and Jess have already talked about it but I’ll try to tell you my own experiences with Pokemon. Not only was Pokemon my first anime, but it introduced me to what being an anime fan means. First off, you can’t just enjoy anime casually, you have to immerse yourself into it. The video games lead me into the anime, and so it goes without saying that I had those, but there was so much more to Pokemon.

My Pokemon merchandise collection was pretty big. I had a Pokedex in both toy and book form, a Pokeball game, Pikachu plushies, Pokemon with marbles in them so you could roll them around, a Pokeball shooter that shot a Masterball on a string, the cards, marbles and marble pouch, bouncy balls, clothes, game guides, novelisations of the anime, toys, toys, and more toys! The list goes on, but my point is, this was when I became a true fan of an anime.

pokemon books

The book was epic!

Pokemon also taught me that being a fan of anime means that you will seem strange to others who are not, and not everyone gets it. My Dad would always watch it with me if he was in the living room at the time and ask me: “What the hell is going on?” I also remember him being one of the first to joke about Brock having his eyes closed all the time. My Mum was also confused, but still took me to see the first movie in the cinema, even though she fell asleep during it. My brother and sister took me to see the second movie in the cinema. My brother was terrified when he thought that the whole film would be like the opening Pikachu short with no dialogue, and my sister tried to understand it by telling me her favorite Pokemon was Pikachu, but once I told her mine was Lugia I saw that she was completely confused! Anime is hard man, but we’ve got to stick by it.

Back int he day Lugia was the bomb!

Back in the day Lugia was the bomb!


Written by The Cosmic Anvil team.

Check out our own Welsh-manga (or ‘Wanga’) series, AGE OF REVOLUTION on our official site and Comixology! AND if you want to join the fight to get the AGE OF REVOLUTION Volume printed check out our Kickstarter campaign

Kickstarter age of revolution volume one cosmic anvil new reward tiers added

Kickstarter new reward tier £15 pledge cosmic anvil

kickstarter age of revolution cosmic anvil new reward tiers pledge comic book comic strip art commission